22 Oct 14
110 notes
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ollidressler:

instagram
22 Oct 14
662 notes
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arunaea:

from inside by 0rwellian on Flickr.

arunaea:

from inside by 0rwellian on Flickr.

(via evajd)

22 Oct 14
62,339 notes
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iwansfvs:

The Cosmic Collider

Link

22 Oct 14
0 notes
10 hours ago

c: I have a date tomorrow.

I’m excited/nervous. I already went out once with this guy but it was very low-key, and it was a ton of fun and he’s very sweet. So we’ll see how it goes. I’m really excited to get to go have fun and just be free and not constantly be worrying about things (relationship-wise, significant other wise). I’m excited that talking comes so naturally when I’m with him and hopefully everything will go smoothly like it did the last time. :)

22 Oct 14
37,438 notes
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someactorkid:

princespectr:

missrem-ains:

graviolies:

johnthedragon:

kingofreaks:

offendedrhino:

Scientists are so clever with naming animals.

No you don’t even know these birds call actually sounds like its saying go away and what it does is it hangs around large groups of herbivores and when a predator shows up it will just start shouting GO AWAY GO AWAY and then all the gazelles and zebras and such will take off.
Heres a great video

G’WEEEEEEHHH

Gweeehhh

GEHH WEEH WEHH



WALUIGI BIRDS

someactorkid:

princespectr:

missrem-ains:

graviolies:

johnthedragon:

kingofreaks:

offendedrhino:

Scientists are so clever with naming animals.

No you don’t even know these birds call actually sounds like its saying go away and what it does is it hangs around large groups of herbivores and when a predator shows up it will just start shouting GO AWAY GO AWAY and then all the gazelles and zebras and such will take off.

Heres a great video

G’WEEEEEEHHH

Gweeehhh

GEHH WEEH WEHH

image

WALUIGI BIRDS

(Source: thats-not-candy-thats-sand, via yourfeverdreams)

22 Oct 14
141,673 notes
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22 Oct 14
23,324 notes
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sorrysistermoon:

s-solstice:

tinyjutsu:

check out what i just finished/what will be in the shop soon!!!

oh my god oh my GOD

OH MY GOD

22 Oct 14
158,867 notes
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vault11overseer:

power-of-allies49:

pleatedjeans:

via

Also one time he was supposed to write a violin and piano duet, and he wrote the violin part, but he didn’t really feel like writing the piano part, or was too lazy etc. When the concert came up (he played the piano while a fiend played the violin) he set up a blank piece of paper (so people would think he was reading music) and improvised. After the concert he wrote it down so it could be published

okay i’ve reblogged this before but can we just give a shoutout to the orchestra that had to sightread the overture to an audience at the premiere of an opera

vault11overseer:

power-of-allies49:

pleatedjeans:

via

Also one time he was supposed to write a violin and piano duet, and he wrote the violin part, but he didn’t really feel like writing the piano part, or was too lazy etc. When the concert came up (he played the piano while a fiend played the violin) he set up a blank piece of paper (so people would think he was reading music) and improvised. After the concert he wrote it down so it could be published

okay i’ve reblogged this before but can we just give a shoutout to the orchestra that had to sightread the overture to an audience at the premiere of an opera

(via sparkleyaceinspace)

22 Oct 14
29,529 notes
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I really don’t have words anymore for this man just please stop him 

(Source: thranduilings, via algrenion)

21 Oct 14
850 notes
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anomalously-written:

[via[Advice from Jody Hedlund]

1. Develop our character before picking the name.
I fill out my character worksheet and get to know as much about my character as possible before deciding on a name. As I develop the character’s personality, ethnicity, quirks, life-experiences, etc., I’m able to narrow down names that might match that person. For example, in The Doctor’s Lady, my heroine is a well-educated, pious lady from a wealthy family. I chose the name Priscilla because it has a more refined and elegant ring than a name like Mary or Betty. 

2. Find names that match our setting and fit with the plot. 
Once my character is starting to come to life, I also evaluate how that character fits within the plot and setting. In my current WIP, which is set in the lumber communities of central Michigan, I sorted through rural names, as well as logging era names. And I tried to think which ones would fit within the tone of the plot.

3. Use time-period appropriate names.
This is especially critical for historical writers. I generally pull up the list of the most popular names for the year or decade in which my character was born. I also look at lists of names in biographies and research books for the particular time period of my book. In the 1600’s, 29% of men were named John (that’s about 1 out of 3 men!) and 15% of women were named Elizabeth. Thus, in The Preacher’s Bride I felt almost obligated to name my MC’s John and Elizabeth. Not really! But you get my point. 

4. Use symbolism if possible.
While we can’t always attach symbolism to names, we can look for ways to give special meaning to some of the names we choose. In my WIP, I looked at the meaning of hero names before choosing one. Whether the reader ever realizes it or not, part of my hero’s character arc is about him learning to live up to his name—which means “strong as a wolf.”

5. Avoid picking names that readers will have a difficult time saying.
I get annoyed when I read character names I can’t pronounce—oddly-spelled or too-long names. This is even more frustrating when the name belongs to the MC and I have to read the “weird” name ten times per page. I suggest avoiding names (as fun and nice as they might be) that might trip up our readers. We should also limit the number of foreign names for the same reason.

6. Avoid having names that start with the same letter or sound. 
I keep a running list of every character that crops up in my book—a sheet I can easily scan. I do my best to start each name with a different letter. I don’t want to have a John, Joseph, and Jacob all in the same book. Or a Polly and Molly. When names are too similar, we have to make our readers work harder to remember our characters. And our job as writers is to make the reading experience as smooth and pleasant as possible.

7. Remember, unique doesn’t always mean better.
Sometimes when names are too unique they can distract a reader from the story. I like unique last names, especially when they’re real (like Goodenough or Covenant). But often those kinds of names have a ring of disbelief. When I get too carried away, my editors send me back to the drawing board for a simpler name (as they did with the two examples I mentioned!). 

8. Make sure our minor character names don’t overshadow our main characters. 
It’s fun to find especially dark and sinister names for our antagonists. In The Doctor’s Lady, one of the bad guys is named Black Squire. He’s a rugged fur trapper that wears a black eye patch. The name fits. But, we have to make sure we don’t spend more time crafting the perfect names for lesser characters so that they become more vibrant and alive than the MC’s.

(via emilyminerinmysoup)

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