30 Jul 14
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Plant a garden in which strange plants grow and mysteries bloom.
— Ken Kesey (via 13thmoon)

(Source: nathanielstuart, via noslepumainapasaule)

30 Jul 14
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30 Jul 14
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thewriterchick:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  

And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 

Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.

I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”

I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.

Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.


(My Son Wears Dresses And That’s OK With Me | Seth Menachem for xoJane)


Can I just say the fact that the little girl’s first reaction was “I’ll tell them to go away” made me tear up?That’s a kid, at such a young age, willing to defend people. That’s a kid who, if her brother wears a dress to school and gets picked on, will run to his side in a minute, regardless of what her friends will say. Oh god the feelings. I can’t handle it.

thewriterchick:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  
And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 
Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.
I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”
I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.
Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.

Can I just say the fact that the little girl’s first reaction was “I’ll tell them to go away” made me tear up?

That’s a kid, at such a young age, willing to defend people. That’s a kid who, if her brother wears a dress to school and gets picked on, will run to his side in a minute, regardless of what her friends will say.

Oh god the feelings. I can’t handle it.

(via ainunno)

30 Jul 14
304 notes
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ianference:

This was the great cast iron staircase that stood at the center of the Samuel R. Smith Infirmary, an 1890 edifice that stood proudly on Staten Island until a few years ago, when it was demolished to little fanfare.  In all honesty, by the point it was demolished, it was probably beyond saving - it would have been prohibitively expensive to rehabilitate the building in its final state.  As I discuss in my blog post on the subject, this highlights the generally failed state of New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission.
Print available here.

ianference:

This was the great cast iron staircase that stood at the center of the Samuel R. Smith Infirmary, an 1890 edifice that stood proudly on Staten Island until a few years ago, when it was demolished to little fanfare.  In all honesty, by the point it was demolished, it was probably beyond saving - it would have been prohibitively expensive to rehabilitate the building in its final state.  As I discuss in my blog post on the subject, this highlights the generally failed state of New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Print available here.

(via gatzly)

29 Jul 14
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koreanmodel:

Sung Hyunjae by Maeng Min Hwa for Esquire Korea April 2012

koreanmodel:

Sung Hyunjae by Maeng Min Hwa for Esquire Korea April 2012

29 Jul 14
18,689 notes
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Ushiku Daibutsu is a statue located in Ushiku, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Completed in 1993, it stands a total of 120 metres (390 ft) tall, including the 10 m (33 ft) base and 10m lotus platform.

Ushiku Daibutsu is a statue located in Ushiku, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Completed in 1993, it stands a total of 120 metres (390 ft) tall, including the 10 m (33 ft) base and 10m lotus platform.

(Source: hormonallyours, via femcascade)

29 Jul 14
36,002 notes
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29 Jul 14
2 notes
1 day ago

That’s how I get inspired to get fit. The fact that this guy has a prosthetic leg and he still manages to work out and look fucking stunning. His fucking muscles. I can’t even. I’m just staring. 

29 Jul 14
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knives-with-hammers:

👍❤️😍

I had to pause what I was watching to properly take in the utter MAJESTY of what I was seeing. Holy SHIT HE’S SO FUCKING GORGEOUS

(Source: the-maleform)

28 Jul 14
435 notes
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vakent:

Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur by Ezekiel.vg on Flickr.
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